Interesting Facts about Dogs for Kids

This post will discuss some very interesting facts about dogs for kids.

Most of this information was found in an excellent article in the DoggingtonPost.com.  I will give the article source and a quote further down in this post.

When parents acquire a dog for a child, they are probably dog lovers.  But they also want their child to learn the responsibility of taking care of a pet.

But children generally learn much more than this when they assume the responsibility of a dog.  Interesting Facts about Dogs for Kids

Kids, through the companionship with their furry friend, become more aware of the dog’s feelings.  This later results in empathy for people’s feelings.

Similar to this, the dog communicates its feelings to the child.  The child learns to understand this communication of the dog’s feelings.  This helps the child in later life to understand the feelings of people – even when these feelings are not expressed verbally.

The child learns a lot from caring for the dog.  The child is proud of his/her ability to keep the dog healthy and happy.

One of the greatest benefits a child gains is an increase in confidence.  Pressures on children, both in and out of school, are great. Much is expected of them.

But a dog provides unconditional love.  It doesn’t matter if the child doesn’t make the best grades in school.   The dog still exhibits unconditional love for the kid.  The child needs this love and acceptance.

The child’s confidence is increased by his/her ability to take care of the dog.

My son, Josh, brought a puppy home from a rescue shelter.  He and Princess became best friends.

When Princess was 6, Josh was transferred to Dallas, Texas.  We thought he would want to leave the dog with us because of the responsibility of taking care of a dog.   Instead, he wanted to take her with him.  He and Princess drove 20 hours together to Dallas.  He has been a great Dad to Princess.

I am certain that Josh experienced the same benefits of having a dog as I have stated above.

The article I mentioned is “Why Your Kids Need a Dog” by Brandy Arnold.  I know you will enjoy reading the entire article.   The article presents some very interesting facts about dogs for kids.

Here is a quote:

A research study published in 2000 by a Child Psychologist in New Mexico named Robert E. Bierer, Ph.D, investigated the relationship that exists between children and pets. To be specific, the study explored the effects of dog ownership on children between ages 10 and 12 years.

Bierer was astounded at the significant difference in self-esteem and empathy between pre-adolescent children who owned a dog and those kids who did not. His conclusions support the increasing body of scientific evidence that reveals how dog ownership causes a substantial impact on a child’s sensitivity to others as well as his self-esteem. The researcher noted that parents, teachers, and other kids have various expectations for a child to live up to. A pet, however, has neither measure of success nor failure. With animals, acceptance is total and unconditional; thus, providing a sense of self-worth.

Nevertheless, the findings do not necessarily mean that all kids are prepared to own a pet. Parents need to first ensure their child wants a pet (and the responsibility of one) and that the child is physically and emotionally prepared for the job.

The entire article can be read here.

As stated in the quote above, kids who grow up with a dog have much more confidence and empathy than those who do not.

Do you have any interesting facts about dogs for kids?  Thanks for your comments.

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