Dog Health Issues – Care for a Curly-Coated Retriever Dog

Dog Health Issues – The Curly-Coated Retriever dog can be an excellent pet and companion.  But there are things you must do to get the best out of this breed. 

All retrievers require a lot of mental and physical exercise.  They are not good apartment pets. 

The Curly-Coated Retriever dog loves swimming and is great for hunting.  Its coat is perfect for cold water swimming. 

If it does not get proper exercise, it can resort to barking and destructive chewing. 

This dog is very loving and affectionate.  It can be great with children.  It also gets along very well with children.

These dogs are different from Golden and Labrador Retrievers.  These two breeds are very welcoming of strangers.  But the Curly-Coated Retriever dog is considered shy but polite when it comes to meeting new people.  They do much better if they are socialized at a young age.

The key to owning a Curly-Coated Retriever dog is to provide good obedience training early in the dog’s life.  Because this breed is extremely smart, it will take well to the training.

It must also have a confident owner to handle the dog in its early years.  It can be rowdy and tend to jump a lot when the dog is young.

The dog health issues include joint and bone problems and eye diseases. Epilepsy and heart problems are increasing concerns in the Curly-Coated Retriever.

I read an article on the Curly-Coated Retriever dog entitled “About Your Curly-Coated Retriever Dog, Health Issues & Grooming!”   Here is a quote:

This dog is easy to get along with and needs to have full obedience training to get the best from this breed. They take about 3 years to fully mature. You will need to be a firm and consistent leader at all times with this dog. These dogs are very loving and affectionate, making them excellent with children.

They need lots of mental and physical exercise as this intelligent dog has tons of energy. Normally if you socialize them, starting at a young age, they will be fine. They absolutely adore swimming so provide this type of exercise for them whenever possible!  as per http://scottlipe.artilclealley.com

This dog`s coat is super easy to care for as it does NOT need combing and brushing, it will only make it frizzy! You may only need a trim here or there, to keep it tidy and only brush when they are seasonally shedding. This dog is not recommended for apartment dwellers as they need lots of space to run and play. As long as they have time outside to release all that energy, playing, running, swimming, etc., they will make great indoor companions.

The complete article can be found here.

Has anyone owned a Curly-Coated Retriever dog?  They are actually fairly rare.

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2 Responses to Dog Health Issues – Care for a Curly-Coated Retriever Dog

  1. Janet says:

    We own our second curly. They are exactly as described. They are extremely affectionate. Both dogs were never jumpers or barkers. Much calmer than a lab! Very sweet, but can be timid with strangers — exactly as this article describes. They can be stubborn/strong willed, but will untimately obey. Our new curly had her first grand mal seizure at age one and has had 50 in the last year — severe epilepsy. She is on 19 pills of 3 different drugs per day at a cost of $200/month. Ask the breeder about epilepsy in the bloodline! We love her and will always have her, but she is not boardable, adoptable, etc. Still, we will always have curlies! Absolutely love this sweet breed.

    • admin says:

      Thanks for the comment, Janet. Curly-Coated Retrievers are great dogs. I am very sorry to hear about the seizures that your new dog is experiencing. Your dogs and your family are in our prayers.

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